The Faravahar: commonly used as a symbol of the Zoroastrian religion since the 19th Century.

The Faravahar: commonly used as a symbol of the Zoroastrian religion since the 19th Century.

Zoroastrianism

Significant Festivals

The Six Gahanbars - Various

Zoroastrians have seven formal feasts, six of which are the gahanbars: Maidyozarem ('mid-spring' feast) Maidyoshahem ('mid-summer' feast) Paitishahem (feast of 'bringing in the harvest') Ayathrem ('bringing home the herds') Maidyarem ('mid-year'/winter feast) Hamaspathmaidyem (feast of 'All Souls')


Noruz (Zoroastrian New Year) - 21 March (Fasli calendar)

Zoroastrians use three different calendars: Fasli, Shahanshahi, and Qadimi. Only the Fasli calendar is synchronised with the Gregorian calendar (dates in common use in the Westrn world). Known as Noruz (also known as Jamshedi or Jamshidi Noruz) this day is the seventh great Zoroastrian feast, dedicated to fire.


Khordad Sal (Birthday of Zoroaster) - 26 March (Fasli calendar)

The birthday of the Prophet is known as the Greater Noruz and is celebrated six days after Noruz. On this day Zoroastrians gather in Fire temples for prayers and then celebrate with feasting.


Information

The Chaplaincy to the University of Glamorgan provides the following information from its own researchers. Each page has been checked by the chaplaincy advisor from the relevant faith group. Within every major religion, there are differences of opinion between leaders, and between leaders and followers. We only aim to provide an overview.